Call for Proposals: Research on Krill biology, ecology and fisheries

Each grant will be for a specific piece of work, and no long-term commitment to any individual or group should be assumed. The AWR is competitive and only proposals that are judged to provide excellent science and to fit the aims of the fund will be considered.
Application Deadline in 5 months

SUSTAINABLE FISHING

Since the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) was first agreed in May 1980, it has been incumbent upon Members to conserve Antarctic marine living resources, whilst also allowing rational use. This has so far been taken to mean sustainable fishing. Under this Convention, fishery management must therefore prevent any fishery-induced change to the marine ecosystem, or minimize the risk of any such change, that is not potentially reversible over two to three decades. Therefore, when making decisions about potential management actions, CCAMLR must take into account the state of available knowledge.

The commercial fishery for Antarctic krill is currently managed under a series of measures that are aimed at being precautionary. CCAMLR has initiated a programme of work that it is hoped will develop a feedback management approach, using decision rules to adjust selected activities (including for example, the distribution and level of krill catch) in response to the state of monitored indicators, while maintaining a precautionary approach and taking into account spatial and temporal ecosystem structure.

In undertaking such a programme of work, CCAMLR has recognised that there are many gaps in knowledge, but that monitored indicators might be used to: (i) provide advance warning about the potential risks of fishing and to advise on requirements for further precaution and/or focused future research and monitoring investments; (ii) adjust catch limits and the spatial distribution of catches; and (iii) characterise long-term changes in the ecosystem to facilitate strategic decision making.

AWR AND RESEARCH PROJECTS

The Antarctic Wildlife Research Fund (hereafter AWR) wishes to contribute to and support the work of CCAMLR so that the Antarctic krill fishery is managed in a sustainable manner consistent with the precautionary approach detailed in the Convention text. The aims of the AWR have therefore been developed to be consistent with the work of CCAMLR.

It is envisaged that any research and monitoring work supported by the AWR will build, incrementally, towards a new management approach for the krill fishery. Funded work should therefore support, rather than replace, the work of CCAMLR. In developing research proposals for consideration by the AWR, it is hoped that projects will be collaborative in nature, including between scientists from different CCAMLR Members, between scientists and krill fishing companies and between government and non-governmental scientists.

Each grant will be for a specific piece of work, and no long-term commitment to any individual or group should be assumed. The AWR is competitive and only proposals that are judged to provide excellent science and to fit the aims of the fund will be considered. Applicants should ensure that their proposals are cost effective, and cost-sharing is encouraged when possible. Where appropriate, the track record of project proponents will be taken into consideration. The inclusion of students or early career scientists is encouraged. All proposals should be presented on the official project application form.

In supporting the development of a feedback management approach for the krill fishery, the AWR wishes to fund work that will increase understanding about how the Antarctic marine ecosystem operates and how it might be characterised as a set of indicators for use by managers. Such work might involve desk or field studies to fill critical knowledge gaps or provide early warning signals about future ecological change.

For the current round of funding USD$150,000 is available. It is unlikely that all of this amount will be awarded to a single project, though this may be possible for a particularly compelling proposal. Successful proposals might generally expect to receive in the order of USD$25,000 to USD$100,000.

PREFERRED RESEARCH PROJECTS FOR 5TH CALL

Critical knowledge gaps that might be preferred in the 5th call for project proposals could include:

  1. Research efforts to better understand krill biology and ecology that inform management of krill fishery. There are a number of outstanding questions relating to ecology of krill, including the depth range of krill population; characteristics of krill swarms and their behaviour; migration and the connectivity between the surface krill populations, and with deep-sea krill; and interaction between krill and krill-predators. This information will help improving krill fisherymanagement, especially deciding upon the best spatial and temporal scale for management.

  2. Spatial management of krill fisheries by CCAMLR has, to date,largely considered the demands of diving predators, including penguins. Information about the level of krill consumption by flying seabirds and fish, and the potential competition with krill fisheries, have long been recognised as major data gaps by CCAMLR. Tracking and at-sea survey data indicate that in some areas of operation, krill fishing vessels overlap with the preferred foraging localities of flying seabirds. Even in situations of limited spatial overlap, there may still be a competitive and therefore functional overlap, as flying seabirds may rely on krill advected from areas where fisheries operate. Improved analyses of both spatial and functional overlap of flying seabirds with krill fisheries and areas of high densities would therefore be informative, particularly as fishing vessels access krill at much deeper depths than flying seabirds, and so may respond differently to krill dynamics.

Other novel or exciting projects, or relevant projects that take advantage of logistical assets of already funded projects, may be considered where they match closely with the aims of the AWR. Such projects should seek to inform risk assessment and the development of feedback management approaches.

Dateline for submission: 19 april 2019
 
Source: The Antarctic Wildlife Research Fund (AWR)

Illustration Photo: Krill (credits: Beth Simmons / PAL LTER / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0))

Read more

Comments

No comments to display.

Related posts

The Application of Mobile Edge Computing in Agricultural Water Monitoring System

In this paper, a data link management solution is proposed in combination with advanced Mobile Edge Computing (MEC) technology, which effectively realizes the sinking of business anchor points and greatly reduces the business response time.

A Review of Commercial Biogas Systems and Lessons for Africa

The review identified the critical barriers to commercial biogas development to be high initial capital costs, weak environmental policies, poor institutional framework, poor infrastructure and a general lack of willpower to implement renewable energy policies and set challenging targets.

Call for applications: The Itron Smart City Challenge

The Itron Smart City Challenge will bring together leading IoT developers from across Europe to tackle a set of key business and societal challenges. These challenges will be designed by city leaders with the goal of identifying breakthrough solutions that enhance citizen wellbeing, improve operational efficiency and build more resourceful communities.
Application Deadline in 2 months

Thailand announced incentives to Boost Investment in Food Innovations

The incentives range from 5-10 years of corporate income tax exemption depending on the type of business and the level of technological advancement. To make this industry more attractive, BOI has offered addition incentives to top up from normal package. The additional incentives such as 50% corporate income tax holiday for five years or an additional two more years of income tax holiday will also be available.

BestMixer.io’s Bitcoin Blender Aims to Bring Anonymity Back to Crypto

The BestMixer.io development team has introduced their next generation bitcoin blender in an effort aimed at disrupting the quickening pace of blockchain analysis firms such as Chainalysis.

A Glimpse of What Lies Ahead for the Hazardous Location Air Conditioners Market

arious types of air conditioners such as central air conditioners, dehumidifiers, and ductless split system, portable are used in hazardous locations.

A Peek At The Immediate Future of the Haptics Technology Market

The global haptic technology market is valued $18.31 billion in the year 2017 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 19.8% from the year 2017 to 2022.

Big Data in Smart Farming – A review

The review shows that the scope of Big Data applications in Smart Farming goes beyond primary production; it is influencing the entire food supply chain. Big data are being used to provide predictive insights in farming operations, drive real-time operational decisions, and redesign business processes for game-changing business models. Several authors therefore suggest that Big Data will cause major shifts in roles and power relations among different players in current food supply chain networks.
a day ago

OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models.
2 days ago

A Peek At The Immediate Future of the Hand Sanitizer Market

The global Hand sanitizer Market is estimated to grow at an estimated CAGR of 7.8% to reach $1,836.3million by 2023. Hand Sanitizer market is anticipated to gain highest level of profit globally by introducing of new skin safe products.