SUEZ has developed a new biogas and biomethane recovery solution, in collaboration with the start-up WAGA ENERGY and with the technical and financial support of ADEME. This innovation improves the energy efficiency of non-hazardous waste storage facilities, reduces greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to circular economy. The biomethane is injected into the local natural gas distribution network operated by GRDF, supporting the region’s ecological transition.

This new technology, officially launched in Saint-Maximin (Oise, France) on June 29, 2017, will optimise the waste’s energy potential and enable SUEZ to become France’s leading producer of biomethane and the operator managing the largest number of biomethane plants in France.

Recovery of biogas from waste storage facilities is a key factor in managing waste and preserving resources. In France, currently only 60% of the biogas produced in these facilities is recovered as electricity or heat. The technology developed by WAGA ENERGY and deployed at the Saint-Maximin plant meet this challenge by recovering biogas even more efficiently than the usual process. From June 2017, 20 GWh of biomethane will be injected into the network every year, equivalent to the gas requirement of 3,000 households.

Recovery of biogas from waste storage facilities is a key factor in managing waste and preserving resources. In France, currently only 60% of the biogas produced in these facilities is recovered as electricity or heat. The technology developed by WAGA ENERGY and deployed at the Saint-Maximin plant meet this challenge by recovering biogas even more efficiently than the usual process. From June 2017, 20 GWh of biomethane will be injected into the network every year, equivalent to the gas requirement of 3,000 households.

Photo: the WAGABOX® (copyright: WAGA ENERGY)

After ten years in development, the WAGABOX®, supported by the “Investissements d’Avenir” (investment for the future) programme, is the first industrial unit capable of extracting biomethane from the mixture of gases produced by decomposing waste which is full of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen and impurities. Following a purification step, the biogas converted into biomethane, which is almost identical to natural gas, can be injected into the GRDF distribution network.

The innovative and ambitious project of Saint-Maximin prompted ADEME, France’s Environment and Energy Management Agency, to provide technical support and €438,920 in funding from its special heat fund.

The launch of this facility with WAGA ENERGY helps meet targets laid out in the French law on energy transition for green growth and is in line with SUEZ’s strategy to increase biogas production by 30% to 50% within the next five years.

Source: SUEZ

 

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