Green Energy could help Developing Countries that are Too Dependent on Commodities Exports Diversify Their Economies

Forecasts show renewable energy accounting for more than 60 per cent of the global increase in electricity output over the next five years. And the falling cost of renewables means they could play a key role in getting electricity to more businesses and homes in developing countries, especially those outside the main cities.
2 years ago

Green energy could help developing countries that are too dependent on commodities exports diversify their economies and reduce their vulnerabilities to volatile markets, UNCTAD Deputy Secretary-General Isabelle Durant has said in Geneva at an international meeting on commodities.

Two out of three developing economies are hostage to price changes in agricultural products, fuels and other commodities, and their growth perspectives were put in check in 2011 when a decade-long commodities boom came to a crashing end.

Getting back on track requires diversifying these countries’ economies. And renewable energies could help.

"Renewable energy has a critical role to play in the structural transformation of developing economies, becoming a potential catalyst for innovation," Ms. Durant said.

"They are part of technology leapfrogging, whereby developing countries are freed from the constraints associated with the development of infrastructure that is heavy, onerous and sometimes difficult to put in place, characteristic of technologies based on fossil fuels," she said, adding that the infrastructure necessary for developing renewable energy technologies is "more flexible and more decentralized".

Forecasts show renewable energy accounting for more than 60 per cent of the global increase in electricity output over the next five years. And the falling cost of renewables means they could play a key role in getting electricity to more businesses and homes in developing countries, especially those outside the main cities.

Source: UNCTAD

Illustration Photo: Solar PV mini-grid powering a water pump for a rural village in Niger (credits: IRENA / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

Read more

Comments

No comments to display.