The Potential Use of Oyster Shell Waste in New Value-Added By-Product

This article offers a solution based on the reuse and recycling of oyster shell residues in the production region of Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. The presented solution is an oyster shell by-product developed by a local company which produces artificial stone

Authors: Thamyres H. Silva, Joana Mesquita-Guimarães, Bruno Henriques, Filipe S. Silva and Márcio C. Fredel 
 
Journal: Resources 2019, 8(1), 13
 
Publisher: MDPI 
 
Abstract
 
Calcium carbonate is one of the most used raw materials in various industries, such as construction materials, food supplement, pharmaceutics, animal feed, plastic production, and others. Calcium carbonate can derive from marine wastes, like crustaceans and bivalve’s shells. The worldwide demand for new sources of food has increased exponentially, and following that tendency, the mariculture especially the oyster culture has been increasingly resorting to farming techniques. In 2016, 438 billion tons of oysters were produced. The majority of the shells were unduly discarded, presenting a public health problem. This article offers a solution based on the reuse and recycling of oyster shell residues in the production region of Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. The presented solution is an oyster shell by-product developed by a local company which produces artificial stone. The main component of the artificial stone is a composite material made of oyster shells incorporated in a polymeric resin. The mechanical properties, such as its flexural strength, hardness, Weibull modulus, and fracture analysis, were held in the artificial stone. The mechanical results of the new artificial stone were compared with other natural stones, such as granite and marble, and other commercial artificial stones. This material owns suitable mechanical properties for table tops and workbenches. Using this product as an artificial stone represents an innovation in the development of a new product and adds commercial value to local waste. This product is an excellent example of a circular economy for local producers who care about the environment, and it encourages the reduction of extraction of natural stone, such as granite and marble.
 
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Illustration Photo: The Oyster Shell Recycling Program has reached its goal! Eleven restaurants are now participating in New Castle County, Delaware. This collaboration diverted about 25,000 pounds of shell from landfills in its first three months. The recycled shell is destined for use in coastal restoration projects along the Delaware Bayshore, which are currently hampered by a lack of needed shell. (credits: Shaun Bailey of the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

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